What happens if I give false information to the police? 

Providing false information to the police is an extremely serious offence which can have a range of ramifications. If you have been or think that you might be charged with perjury or some other form of making a false statement to the police, you should consider hiring a decent criminal lawyer.

The penalties for making a false statement to the police will vary depending on the severity and context of the infringement. In this article we’ll have a look at these penalties, at some of the things you should do if you’re charged with a crime in this category and at a few of the reasons why you should always use a decent lawyer to defend yourself.

What Constitutes “False Information”?

There are basically two types of false information that you can provide to the authorities. They include:

Lying to the police during an investigation – The most common form of false information comes as small lies to the police. People often don’t tell the full truth or tell a twisted version of a story to cover themselves and to try and prevent trouble.

Lying in court – On the other hand, you might be accused of lying in court. Again, this is a very serious crime, and can result in significant fines or even prison sentences.

It’s important to note that making honest mistakes isn’t an offence – providing false information that you thought was true won’t get you into trouble.

Parenting arrangements – are they legally binding?

Separating couples who have children together have a legal requirement to provide for their children, making sure that their interests are looked after. Some people choose to use a family lawyer to resolve custody disputes, especially if a separation is nasty or on unfriendly terms.

On the other hand, a lot of parents come to informal parenting plans and arrangements. These might be in the form of documents that are signed and dated or verbal agreements. The important thing to realise is that many parenting arrangements aren’t always legally binding.

In this article we’ll explore the formalities surrounding parenting arrangements, when they are legally binding, when they aren’t and the things you can do to protect yourself and your children.

Are Written Agreements Legally Binding?

In truth, informal written parenting agreements aren’t usually legally binding – even if they’re complete in the presence of a family lawyer or other legal professional. However, they do have the benefit of helping separated parents move on with their lives.

On the other hand, problems can arise if one parent decides that they don’t want to continue to follow the agreement. They can effectively do what they want, potentially disrupting both the lives of both the other parent and the children in question.

One of the best things to do is to make sure that your parenting agreements are formalised by the courts. A family lawyer will be able to guide you on the process of doing this.

Why should I speak to a lawyer when negotiating a new business lease?

Negotiating a new business lease can be difficult. From your point of view, you need to try and get the best deal possible by signing a favourable lease. However, the lessor will also be trying to get the best deal possible, by charging higher rent and making you sign a longer lease.

Commercial lease negotiations can become complicated if you’re not sure what you’re doing. It is therefore usually a good idea to employ a commercial lawyer to help you negotiate your lease. They will be able to read through any legal documents before you sign them, making sure that you haven’t overlooked anything that you’re going to regret in the future.

Here’s a few of the other ways a commercial lawyer can help you negotiate the best business lease possible:

They Will Be Able To Help You Work Out Fit-Out Costs

If you’re leasing an effectively empty building for your business then you will need to fit it out somehow. Your lawyer will be able to facilitate discussions about this between you and the lessor, making sure that you get a favourable deal.

When is my relationship considered ‘De Facto’?

De facto relationships are becoming increasingly common in the modern world as less and less people marry at an early age. Instead, people often decide to live together without getting married, which leads to them being considered a ‘de facto’ couple under the eyes of the law at some point.

Now, there are important legal considerations that you need to be aware of once you are considered to be in a de facto relationship. The best way to understand these is to speak with your local family lawyer, but we’ve done our best to provide a brief overview below.

What is a de facto relationship?

The exact definition of a de facto relationship does differ by state in Australia, but basically it involves a serious relationship between two people who aren’t married, but who live together as if they are. There are a lot of things to think about when working out if you’re in a de facto relationship or not, including:

  • How long you’ve been together.
  • How long you’ve been living together. Usually you need to be living together at least part of the time to be considered de facto.
  • Whether there’s a sexual relationship and whether you have children together.
  • Whether you share joint bank accounts or own major joint assets.
  • Whether you act as if you’re married or in a serious relationship when you’re in public.

As you can see, there are a lot of factors that contribute to help the law identify if you’re in a de facto relationship or not. If it’s particularly important for you to know then consider speaking to your local family lawyer.